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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 865-869

Dermatoglyphics and Malocclusion


1 Professor, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Narsinhbhai Patel Dental College and Hospital, Visnagar, Gujarat, India
2 Post-graduate Student, Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Narsinhbhai Patel Dental College and Hospital, Visnagar, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
H Baswaraj
Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Narsinhbhai Patel Dental College and Hospital, Visnagar, Gujarat, India

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.2047/jioh-08-08-06

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Background: Dermatoglyphics, coined by Cummins and Midlo in 1926, is a branch of genetics dealing with the skin ridge system. From cradle to grave, until the body decomposes fingerprints remain unchanged. Dermatoglyphics is the study on epidermal ridges on the palmar and plantar surfaces of the feet and hand. Dermatoglyphic patterns, share their development time during the intrauterine period, with the development and completion of dental hard tissues. Malocclusion, a dental disorder, with its genetic etiology being proven, thus gains attention in this field. Materials and Methods: A total of 60, 9-12 years old, healthy children, with mixed dentition, were included in the study. Their left and right handprints were recorded on a paper, and the fingerprints were studied to find the frequency of occurrence of different types of patterns. Based on the dental aesthetic index, malocclusion was graded into four groups and then was correlated with the patterns' frequency. Results: Loops were found to increase and while the whorls decreased, with increasing severity of malocclusion. In this study, loop pattern is a more common in the thumb and middle finger. Whorl pattern is a more common in the ring finger and index finger. Conclusion: Dermatoglyphic analysis can be used as an indicator of malocclusion at an early age, thereby aiding the development of treatments aiming to establish favorable occlusion. Inheritance and twin studies, as well as those conducted in different ethnic groups, are required to examine these relationships further.


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