JIOH on LinkedIn JIOH on Facebook
  • Users Online: 976
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 12  |  Page : 1101-1104

Quest for Biofriendly Xylene Substitutes in Histopathology: A Comparative Study


1 Post-graduate Student, Department of Oral Pathology & Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, M.S. Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Professor and Head, Department of Oral Pathology & Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, M.S. Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bengaluru,Karnataka,India
3 Tutor,DepartmentofOralPathology& Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, M.S. Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Assistant Professor, Department of Oral Pathology & Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, M.S. Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
5 Associate Professor, Department of Oral Pathology & Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, M.S. Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
6 Associate Professor, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and Diagnostic Sciences, Division of Oral Pathology, College of Dentistry, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Snehashish Ghosh
Post-graduate Student, Department of Oral Pathology & Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, M.S. Ramaiah University of Applied Sciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.2047/jioh-08-12-10

Rights and Permissions

Background: Xylene is an aromatic hydrocarbon widely used in histopathology laboratory. However, exposure to xylene is a well-documented occupational hazard. This study intended to find a natural, non-toxic, economical substitute for xylene to minimize its hazardous effects and make the histopathological laboratory an biofriendly environment. Objectives: (1) To evaluate the efficacy of extra virgin olive oil and refined sunflower oil (RSO) as a clearing and deparaffinizing agent in histopathological staining, (2) To compare the efficacy of olive oil and RSO as a clearing and deparaffinizing agent with regard to xylene. Materials and Methods: Commercially available fresh goat tissue was procured and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin for 48 h. The tissues were divided into three experimental groups (Groups I, II, and III). Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for all the three groups. Group I was processed and stained using xylene as clearing and deparaffinizing agent. Groups II and III were processed and stained using olive oil and RSO, respectively. Evaluation was done by three pathologists and the entire procedure was blinded. Statistical analysis was accomplished by Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, Chi-square test, and Kappa statistics. Results: Results showed both the oils had the ability to clear and deparaffinize tissues. Extra virgin olive oil was comparatively better, it maintained the tissue integrity, and the overall staining quality was also better when compared to RSO. Conclusion: To conclude, extra virgin olive oil and RSO can be used as a biofriendly substitute to xylene in histopathological laboratory.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1155    
    Printed27    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded89    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal